List of Forthcoming Journals

The journals in the list below have been accepted for publication in Operations and Supply Chain Management: An International Journal. We are currently in the process of assigning each of these entries into our upcoming issue. Once published, you can access the corresponding article for free through our repository. Please feel free to contact us via Contact Us page or our email for any inquiries.


1. Analysis of Multi-objective Decision Problems in Humanitarian Supply Chains

Author(s):
Takeo Kobayashi (Ricoh Company Ltd., Japan),
Yacob Khojasteh (Sophia University, Japan),
Yasutaka Kainuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan)

Abstract:
In humanitarian supply chains, there is a need to consider how to distribute the limited relief supplies that have not been prepared sufficiently to each shelter. Different from commercial supply chains that prioritize cost reduction, in humanitarian supply chains, it is important to consider not only reducing the distribution cost but also how to deliver goods quickly to satisfy the demands of shelters. Three metrics have been proposed for humanitarian supply chains: efficiency, equity, and efficacy. The objective of this paper is to define the metric of efficacy to minimize distribution time to each shelter considering the relief goods arrival. Under the situation after the disaster, to supply relief goods agilely and fairly, it is necessary to take account the weight of each metric adequately. We formulate a multiobjec-tive mathematical model by the multiple metrics and carry out the optimization by using the model. The results show that the proposed multi-objective model is very promising in dealing with complicated humanitarian supply chains. Additionally, we show the deviation between the result of each metric and the multi-objective evaluation.

2. A shopping-path length estimation using Markov-chain-based shopper dynamics model

Author(s):
Shunichi Ohmori (Waseda University, Japan),
Masao Ueda (Waseda University, Japan),
Kazuho Yoshimoto (Waseda University, Japan)

Abstract:
We propose a framework of estimating shopping-path length, in which the floor is represented by the graph G(V,E) with a vertex set V and an arc set E and the shopping-path length is measured by the number of zones (vertices) shoppers visit. We used the Markov-chain to model the dynamics of distribution of shoppers on the vertecies in the graph. We derive the (discrete) probability distribution of shopping path length using the transition matrix in the Markov-chain, and derive the expected path length. We proposed the index called the improvement importance index to quantify how local changes in the transition probability affect the entire shopping path length. We have tested our framework to the test data from an industrial application and the estimated path-length is compared to the actual one. We have a result that the error of estimation is 0.2%.

3. An evaluation of order-picking tour efficiency in two-block warehouses

Author(s):
Ömer Öztürko?lu (Ya?ar University, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey),
Deniz Ho?er (Bornova, Izmir, Turkey)

Abstract:
This study investigates the effects of critical operational and strategical decisions in order-picking warehouses on order pickers’ tour lengths. For this study, one of the most-commonly applied layouts in practice, called two-block layout with a central cross aisle, was considered. A full factorial experimental design and multiple-comparisons (Bonferroni t-tests) were applied to statistically determine the significance of various levels of storage policies, pick-list sizes, warehouse shape ratios, warehouse sizes and their all interactions on average tour length. The analysis showed that deeper storage areas were superior to wider areas in small- and medium-sized warehouses. Warehouse designs with a 1:1 width-to-depth shape ratio offered the most robust layouts. Within-storage aisle policy significantly reduced order-picking tour length and generally outperformed other storage policies.

4. A Multi Echelon Location-Inventory Model with Lateral Transshipment

Author(s):
Mohammad Reza Gholamian (Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Iran),
Mustafa Nasri (Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Iran)

Abstract:
In this research, a supply chain system consisting producer, distribution centers and retailers is modeled by considering lateral transshipment between distribution centers and also using echelon-based inventory system instead of independent inventory system. The model is developed in the form of mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) to minimize the total location, transportation, and inventory costs of the system. The model was solved using conic programming approach and validity was examined by comparing the developed model with the basic model (i.e. the model without the contributions) in several instances with different sizes of distributors and retailers. The results represent superiority of the developed model in computational time and objective value especially in medium and large scale problems.

5. Modelling facility location problems in emerging markets – The case of the public healthcare sector in Morocco

Author(s):
Asmae El Mokrini (Equipe AMIPS-Ecole Mohammadia d’Ingénieurs, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco),
Youssef Boulaksil (UAE University, College of Business and Economics, P.O. Box 15551, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates),
Abdelaziz Berrado (Equipe AMIPS-Ecole Mohammadia d’Ingénieurs, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco)

Abstract:
Locating facilities in an emerging market involves specific characteristics that are different from developed countries. The differences between these two settings suggest that facility location modelling can present substantially different challenges when applied to an emerging market as opposed to a developed country. In this study, we develop a variant of the set covering model that explicitly takes specific characteristics into consideration. The model has been constructed and validated based on a real-life case study concerning the Moroccan Ministry of Health which is currently considering the redesign of its supply chain of pharmaceutical products. Amongst the findings, this paper shows that road infrastructure and demand dispersion affect the strategic decision of facility locations.

6. The Influence of Shopping Path Length on Sales Growth and Its Variance

Author(s):
Shunichi Ohmori (Waseda University, Japan),
Masao Ueda (Waseda University, Japan),
Kazuho Yoshimoto (Waseda University, Japan)

Abstract:
We study the influence of shopping path length on the number of items purchased. It is a well known fact in in-store shopper marketing that the longer the travel distance, the more items purchased. We analyze a shopping path data of 556 shoppers collected at a retail store in an urban are in Tokyo, Japan. We observed the fact the longer the travel distance, the greater the variance of the number of items purchased as well as its average. To explain this fact, we proposed a probability model of sequential purchase decisions using the Bernoulli process. We can estimate the number of items purchased as the binomial distribution given the shopping path. In the case study, we show how this assumption can be justified by the data from a real store.

7. Offshoring Decisions: A Comprehensive & Conceptual Framework

Author(s):
Amulya Gurtu (University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, USA),
Ramesh Saxena (Humber College, Canada),
Nilesh B. Sah (Northeastern Illinois University, USA)

Abstract:
The paper presents complexities involved in offshoring decisions and provides a comprehensive framework for making a reliable decision for offshoring. There is a need for a holistic approach to offshoring decisions. The paper identifies various drivers, categorizes them as revenue or cost drivers and analyzes their impact on the offshoring outcomes. The framework rationalizes the extremes of unprecedented successes and unexpected failures among organizations engaged in offshore outsourcing. The proposed framework is expected to improve the quality of offshoring decisions. The proposed framework approaches offshore outsourcing decisions at a strategic level and will improve organizations’ performance on the triple bottom line.

8. SUPPLY CHAIN INCENTIVE ALIGNMENT: THE GAP BETWEEN PERCEIVED IMPORTANCE AND ACTUAL PRACTICE

Author(s):
Andreas Norrman (Lund University, Sweden),
Dag Näslund (University of North Florida)

Abstract:
Incentive alignment is discussed as one of the key factors for successful implementation of supply chain management. However, there is a lack of empirical research regarding implementation as well as evaluation of the effects of alignment mechanisms in practice. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore and describe the current practice and to identify gaps of Supply chain incentive alignment. The study is an explorative and descriptive survey study based on forty-eight responses from members, supply chain officers, of the Swedish Supply chain panel. The theoretical lenses are based on literature discussing incentive alignment in supply chains, e.g. principal-agency theory and supply chain contracting, but also on literature discussing internal process based management and rewards for goal congruence. The study shows a clear gap between perceived importance and realized practice of both external (interorganizational) and internal (cross-functional) incentive alignment. Very few of the existing sophisticated coordinating mechanisms proposed in theory were used to any significant extent. In fact, the internal incentive structures seem to counter act, and not support, supply chain orientation. This finding relates not only to non-logistics departments but also to functions in “the logistics family”. The major challenge, both externally and internally, is to be able to define incentives that drives behaviour in the right direction. The study clearly shows gaps between practitioners’ intent and current practice, and it provides a broad range of more sophisticated and coordinating mechanisms than the ones mainly used today.

9. AN EXPLORATION OF THE MEASUREMENT OF RELATIONAL CAPITAL IN SUPPLY CHAINS

Author(s):
Barbara Ocicka (, SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Poland),
Gra?yna Wieteska (University of Lodz, Poland)

Abstract:
The aim of the paper is to identify and systemise dimensions and measures that can be used to evaluate buyer-supplier relational capital (RC). The authors used a literature review methodology composed of the following phases: question formulation, keyword search in databases, screening and analysis of articles. As a result, 45 articles were selected and finally analysed in detail. It was found that several theories can help to explain how buyer-supplier relationships contribute to a company’s value and competitive advantage. Furthermore, RC as an element of social capital deserves more investigation in a supply chain management context. Accordingly, to date there has been no relevant in-depth studies exploring the measurement of relational capital in supply chains. On the base of the review of research articles published between 2004 and 2018, the list of items used by researchers to measure the relational capital was explored. Then, authors proposed a construct for relational capital consisting of 5 items such as: trust, close interaction, respect, reciprocity and commitment, that were shortly discussed. Taking them all into account, an authorial definition of supply chain relational capital was proposed. Although, the final results contribute to the study of RC measurement within buyer-supplier relationships in supply chains, the analysis still has some shortcomings that need to be addressed in further literature studies and empirical research.