List of Forthcoming Journals

The journals in the list below have been accepted for publication in Operations and Supply Chain Management: An International Journal. We are currently in the process of assigning each of these entries into our upcoming issue. Once published, you can access the corresponding article for free through our repository. Please feel free to contact us via Contact Us page or our email for any inquiries.


1. Information Technology Outsourcing: Influence of Supplier Firm Size and Reputation on Buyers’ A Priori Perceptions of Opportunism and Uncertainty

Author(s):
Imran M. Khan (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA),
Brian N. Rutherford (Kennesaw State University, USA),
Alvin J. Williams (University of South Alabama, USA)

Abstract:
Growth in outsourcing has led to a renewed focus on vendor and/or business partner evaluation and selection criteria as inept selection can have an adverse impact on core organizational outcomes such as revenues and profitability. Outsourcing activities include use of a third party to perform a variety of business functions such as contract manufacturing, sales, distribution, public relations, and information technology (IT) management. While transaction cost analysis (TCA) researchers have extensively studied outsourcing arrangements, they have not examined how vendor firm characteristics affect buyers’ a priori or pre-contract perceptions of opportunism and uncertainty during the vendor evaluation phase. Similarly, while the procurement research stream has identified and explained a range of supplier characteristics and their affect on buyer’s vendor selection processes, it lacks integration with TCA. This paper purports to advance both TCA and vendor selection research streams by studying the influence of supplier firm size and reputation on buyers’ pre-contract perceptions of opportunism and uncertainty. Higher opportunism and technological uncertainty perceptions in a pre-contract stage can prevent a vendor or channel partner from winning business. Support is found for a relationship between vendor firm reputation and buyers’ a priori perceptions of opportunism and uncertainty. Results further show that stronger reputation can mitigate the perception of opportunism, larger firm size, on the contrary, raises the degree of perceived opportunism. Results also support a relationship between opportunism and technological uncertainty.

2. Relationships between green supply chain drivers, Triple Bottom Line sustainability and operational performance: An empirical investigation in the UK manufacturing supply chain

Author(s):
Susmita Pattnaik (Codaemon Softwares Pvt. Ltd., Hadapsar, Pune – 411028, Maharashtra, India),
Subhra Pattnaik (Xavier University, Bhubaneswar, Harirajpur – 752050, Odisha, India)

Abstract:
Sustainability has assumed salience over the past years, thereby becoming a corporate mantra as well as a promising research area. Most sustainability studies have focused on environment friendly operations contributing to the concept. However, sustainability extends beyond environmental performance to also encompass economic and social performance. All the three factors combine to form the ‘Triple bottom line (TBL) performance’. This paper is an empirical investigation of the effect of green supply chain (GSC) drivers on the TBL performance and the influence of TBL performance on operational performance of manufacturing companies in United Kingdom (UK). Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to reveal that GSC drivers like supplier and customer pressure and environmental purchasing positively influenced social and economic performance respectively, whereas eco-design and production influenced all the three parameters of TBL performance. It was interesting to find that social and economic performance, but not environmental performance, had a significant positive influence on firm’s operational performance.

3. FIXED SHIPPING COST ALLOCATION FOR JUST-IN-TIME (JIT) LOT-SPLITTING

Author(s):
Joong Y. Son (MacEwan University, Canada)

Abstract:
This paper studies benefits of just-in-time (JIT) lot-splitting and multiple shipments for an order placed by the retailer in a two-stage supply chain. In a typical order placement and delivery setting between the buyer and the vendor, the treatment of the shipping cost is not clear and is contingent on negotiations between the parties involved. The outcome of such settlement often results in suboptimal practices in the supply chain. This paper investigates how the optimal and incentive aligned allocation of the fixed shipping cost from the manufacturer to the retailer can be obtained with the lot-splitting policy. Numerical results indicate that both the lot-splitting policy parameter and the fixed cost structures (e.g., fixed shipping to ordering cost ratio) command significant impact on the shipment frequency and the supply chain cost. The paper further proposes an approach to identify settings beneficial for the system.

4. Understanding the Impacts of Length of the Contract and Fleet Size on Spare Parts Level and Reliability Investments in Performance-based Contracting

Author(s):
Hasan Uvet (Savannah State University, USA),
Hasan Celik (University of North Texas, USA),
Carullah Y. Kucuk (University of North Texas, USA)

Abstract:
This essay investigates the impacts of contract features such as contract length and fleet size on reliability investment, spare parts, supplier’s profit, and the annual cost of the system in performance-based contracting (PBC). The impact of each contract feature analyzed using the multi-objective genetic algorithm in a mathematical model. We found that failure rates of the systems and the annual unit cost for the buyer exponentially decrease when the fleet size or contract length becomes larger. Also, an annual profit of suppliers grows substantially with an increase in fleet size and length of contracts. Additionally, we explored that these features have little impact on spare parts in PBC. Findings of this study advance understanding of the impact of fleet size and the length of contracts on decisions made by suppliers for the reliability and inventory investments in PBC. Furthermore, practitioners will benefit from the results to build effective and efficient PBC.

5. SUPPLY CHAIN FINANCE FOR SMES - CASE IN DANANG CITY

Author(s):
Le Thi Minh Hang (University of Economics – The university of Danang, Vietnam ),
Nguyen Son Tung (University of Economics – The university of Danang, Vietnam)

Abstract:
Recently, the number of Vietnamese small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is rapidly growing. Since most of them are run under owner’s capital, they easily face cash constraint situation during their operational life cycle. Hence, the demand for Vietnamese SMEs to optimize their liquidity has been increasing and becoming a top concern. Previous studies in the supply chain field focus much on the physical flow of products/services and informational flow. Meanwhile, the financial aspect as well as its sustainability in the supply chain has been received more attention after the financial crisis of 2008. This even gets more crucial when the uncertainties in the global economy and financial markets increase pressure on businesses’ cash as well as their supply chains (SC). Considering the role of this concept and its potential, this study tries to explore and examine the level of understanding about the monetary supply chain of SMEs based in Danang city and how they can access financial sources for more stability and sustainable business. The truth is, many SMEs face existing problems to access financial sources like banks as well as establishing a long-lasting SC. Without a doubt the fund-raising information infrastructure in Danang city is not well developed, and local businesses still depend on financial sources from banks. Also, the connection between buyers and suppliers is still weak as they do not invest much in the infrastructure or production line to create a common ground with the business’s product characteristics. In addition to that, this paper suggests some implications for the development of the local SMEs in general and their supply chains in particular.

6. Product Variety, Supply Chain Complexity and the Needs for Information Technology: A Framework Based on Literature Review

Author(s):
Estu Rizky Huddiniah (Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Indonesia),
Mahendrawathi ER2 (Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Indonesia)

Abstract:
Recently, many companies are competing against each other to be the first to offer new product in the market, even when offering new products brings additional challenges for their operations. At the same time, information technology is chosen as the most effective solution to help company facing supply chain problems that arise due to increasing flow of materials and information in the supply chain. However, many companies still do not fully considered the importance of aligning the needs of information technology with the supply chain and business conditions. This paper conduct a structured literature review on the influence of product variety, supply chain complexity, and the needs level of information technology. Based on the literature review a conceptual framework is developed that highlight three propositions: the potential relations between product variety and supply chain complexity, supply chain complexity and information technology, and the importance of aligning the implementation of information technology with the company’s business condition. Finally, the main propositions from this study is that there are potential connections among product variety, supply chain complexity, business condition and information technology.

7. Importance of Logistics Service Quality in Customer Satisfaction: An Empirical Study

Author(s):
Hasan Uvet (Savannah State University, USA)

Abstract:
To create value in logistics services to fill the expectation of customers gets more significant than ever to sustain competitiveness in the market. In this paper, considering there is a small amount of research done in logistic service quality, we aimed to investigate how logistics services affect customer satisfaction. An empirical study was made to measure logistic service quality factors; personnel quality contact, order condition, timeliness, order discrepancy handling, and operational information sharing in logistics services. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) has been used in this paper to explore customer satisfaction by using the five constructs of logistics service quality. One of the contributions of this article is; it is the first time the effects of operational information sharing on customer satisfaction in logistics services was investigated under the logistic service quality framework. Customer satisfaction can be explained and improved by applying these five constructs of logistics service quality. Also, this research can help both practice and scholars to understand the fundamental elements of improving customer satisfaction. The results can be used in any firm to gain competitiveness in logistic services.

8. Inter-functional coordination to co-create value within integrated value chains for competitive supply chain

Author(s):
Umer Mukhtar (University of Management and Technology, Pakistan),
Tashfeen Mahmood Azhar (University of Management and Technology, Pakistan)

Abstract:
This paper aims to develop a conceptual model that can assist managers in the development of competitive value chain using value co-creation and integration to make the whole supply chain competitive. The model is based on theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of value co-creation, network theory, value chain, and customer value theory. The model focuses on the idea that integrated value chains with high value co-creation abilities within them would make the whole supply chain competitive. That means that if the individual firms along the supply chain work on improving their value co-creation abilities, and they are well-integrated, it will increase the whole supply chain competitiveness. It is a conceptual model that needs to be operationalized and empirically tested in the future. The model suggests high value co-creation abilities in the individual value chains with a well-integrated supply chain as a basis for supply chain competitiveness. The model includes several theoretical and conceptual views related to value co-creation. However, it may be possible to add some additional perspectives in the future research.

9. Assessing Cause and Effect in Supply Chain Problems Using Sports Ranking Models

Author(s):
Don Pope (Abilene Christian University, USA)

Abstract:
Supply chain problems are complex to understand and solve because of the interaction between multiple factors within and between tiers of the chain. Causal factors in business process deficiencies can be thought of as networks of factors, each of which has possible cause-effect relationship with selected other factors. The full significance of any given factor cannot be understood by evaluating just direct relationships between factors, but must be evaluated considering the total direct and indirect influences throughout the entire network of causal linkages. Because of their applicability to such general networks of relationships, sports ranking methodologies have application to cause-effect analysis. Three different matrix-based sports ranking methodologies are discussed and applied to quality cause-effect analysis: Google PageRank, Colley and Massey methods. Of these three, the PageRank and Massey methods are shown to be reasonable approaches in this application context, depending on the causal data available. All the methods are intuitive to apply and compute with spreadsheets.

10. Bio-Medical Waste Management Processes and Practices Adopted by Select Hospitals in Pune

Author(s):
Suruchi Pandey (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies Pune, India ),
Brig (Dr.) Rajiv Divekar (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies Pune, India ),
Amandeep Singh (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies Pune, India ),
Srividhya Sainath (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies Pune, India )

Abstract:
The 21st century is said to have been a particularly eventful century with spectacular changes all around the world. The population is on a steady rise and as expected this rise in inhabitants has resulted in the need for the best-in-class medical facilities. This study has been undertaken to explore biomedical waste management process, practices and disposal chain adopted by selected hospitals with special reference to the city of Pune, India. There is a mandate laid down by the Government of India for the Bio-Medical waste (BMW) with regard to its proper management, collection, segregation, storage, disposal and incineration of medical waste in private as well as public hospitals. The secondary study has indicated multiple issues associated with waste handling and management, which led to healthcare and hygiene implications. So as a part of this study researcher’s aim to answer whether it is unawareness or negligence which is leading to such causalities. Also, are the processes & practices adopted at Public & Private sector hospitals varies significantly or not? A checklist was prepared to study the BMW Management process and practices followed by different hospitals in Pune City of India. The results showed a significant difference between their process & practice of Biomedical Waste Management. Also, random sampling about knowledge of BMW showed that government hospitals and their healthcare staff are casual in their approach towards implementing the Biomedical Waste Management process as compared to private sector hospital.